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  • Food allergy refers to an allergic reaction to a protein found within food. Food allergies can develop at any time during a cat's life, typically causing chronic, year-round itching and skin inflammation. Affected cats may develop recurrent infections of both the skin and ears. Food allergies are diagnosed by performing a food trial and managed through the long-term feeding of a food that does not trigger an allergic reaction.

  • An allergy is a state of over-reactivity or hypersensitivity of the immune system to a particular substance called an allergen. Most allergens are proteins from plants, insects, animals, or foods. In the dog, the most common symptom associated with allergies is itching of the skin, either localized (in one area) or generalized (all over the body). The symptoms of allergies can be confused with other disorders, or occur concurrently with them. Therefore, do not attempt to diagnose your dog without veterinary professional assistance.

  • One of the most common medical conditions affecting cats is allergy. Flea allergy, food allergies, atopy, and contact allergies are examples of allergies in cats, with flea allergy being the most common cause. Flea allergy is a response to proteins or antigens present in the flea's saliva, and just one fleabite may cause such intense itching that the cat may severely scratch or chew itself, leading to the removal of large amounts of hair. Food allergy testing is conducted by feeding an elimination or hypoallergenic diet. If your cat's symptoms improve after the food trial, a presumptive diagnosis of food allergy is made.

  • An allergy is a state of over-reactivity or hypersensitivity of the immune system to a particular substance called an allergen. Dogs with allergies develop a hypersensitivity reaction or response to substances (for example pollens, flea saliva, or food). With atopy, the dog's immune system overreacts to an airborne or inhaled allergen. After flea allergy dermatitis (FAD), atopy is the second most common type of allergy in the dog. Affected dogs chew, lick and scratch all over, especially on the feet and face.

  • Food allergy is one of the five most common allergies or hypersensitivities known to affect dogs. In a pet with an allergy, the immune system overreacts and produces antibodies to substances that it would normally tolerate. In the dog, the signs of food allergy are usually itchy skin or digestive disturbances such as vomiting or diarrhea. The best and most accurate method of diagnosing food allergy is to feed a hypoallergenic diet for eight to twelve weeks as a food trial called an elimination trial.

  • Atopy, also known as inhalant allergy, is a common cause of skin problems in cats. Cats with atopy are often allergic to the same allergens that affect humans: tree pollens, grass pollens, weeds, molds, and dust mites. Cats develop skin inflammation in response to these allergens. Atopy is a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning that your veterinarian will rule out other, similar skin conditions in order to arrive at a diagnosis. If your cat is diagnosed with atopy, lifelong management will be required in order to manage your cat's clinical signs.

  • Your cat has allergies. These instructions have been provided by your veterinary healthcare team to help you treat your cat for her specific allergy. The instructions that relate to your cat are checked.

  • Your dog has allergies. These instructions have been provided by your veterinary healthcare team to help you treat your dog for his specific allergy. The instructions that relate to your dog are checked.

  • Pruritus is the medical term for itching and is a common clinical sign of many skin disorders. It is often accompanied by red, inflamed areas of skin and may lead to skin infection called pyoderma. Flea allergy dermatitis, seasonal allergies, atopy, food allergies, contact dermatitis, and sarcoptic mange are some of the most common causes of pruritus in dogs. In the majority of dogs pruritus is seasonal and the most common causes are inhalant allergies, fleabites and food allergies.

  • Pesky allergies can interfere with the fun of owning a dog. There are varying opinions on the matter, but it is generally thought that even though there is no canine breed that is 100% hypoallergenic, there are breeds that are less likely to stimulate allergies in people.